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Despite lack of competition, election ads in Ohio are plentiful
University of Cincinnati professor David Niven says he believes the money is spent to keep voters aware
by WKSU's STATEHOUSE BUREAU CHIEF KAREN KASLER
This story is part of a special series.


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Karen Kasler
 
David Niven, professor at the University of Cincinnati, says the noncompetitive race for governor may be creating a sense of urgency among those candidates in the downticket races.
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Polls and pundits have predicted a bad year for Democrats and big wins for Republicans in Ohio next Tuesday.

Overall, campaign spending on commercial radio and TV is way down in Ohio. But there are still a lot of political ads on the air – including from candidates who are expected to win by big margins.

University of Cincinnati political science professor David Niven says he thinks there’s a simple reason.

LISTEN: Niven says political ads wake people up

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“I think those ads are on the air to wake folks up," Niven says. "This has been such a quiet election that I think there’s a real concern that a number of voters out there have a very easy time not being aware there is an election.”

The lack of ads in the governor’s race has opened up time for commercials for the down-ticket races for attorney general, auditor, secretary of state and treasurer.

And Niven says the noncompetitive race for governor may be creating a sense of urgency among those down-ticket candidates, who still want voters to show up and vote in those contests.

 
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