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Anti-fracking groups organize nationwide rallies
Portage County group say job claims are exaggerated
by WKSU's SIMON HUSTED

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Simon Husted
 
Anti-fracking advocates march down West Riddle Avenue near downtown Ravenna.
Courtesy of Simon Husted
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Anti-fracking groups across Ohio and 10 other states pitched tables and tents yesterdayto try to persuade residents that hydraulic fracturing needs more government oversight.

Concern Citizens of Portage County were among those holding informational ralling to protest the proliferation of fracking in eastern Ohio.

Spokeswoman Gwen Fischer, acknowledges that the boom in drilling for oil and natural gas in Ohio’s shale formations has boosted employment, but says that’s just temporary.

Job claims

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A man hangs an anti-fracking sign around a sign.
Anti-fracking advocates line up along West Riddle Avenue in downtown Ravenna.
A woman holds up two anti-fracking signs at the rally near downtown Ravenna.
Members of Concerned Citizens of Portage County set up tables and yard signs for Wednesday's rally.
Gwen Fischer, right, helped organize Wednesday rally against fracking in Ohio.
Gwen Fischer, right, helped organize Wednesday rally against fracking in Ohio.
A small girl stakes an anti-fracking yard sign into the ground near the First Congregational Church near downtown Ravenna.
An anti-fracking yard sign stands up from the ground near the First Congregational Church in downtown Ravenna.

“Most of the technical work will be done by people from out-of-state,” Fischer says. “That is the way it has been done everywhere else. The figures that I have seen show that the calculations for the number of jobs are really way too high and they are not realistic because they don’t take into account that the production of these wells drop by half within the first two years.”

One of the primary concerns of the protesters is the proliferation of deep wells used to dispose of the chemical waste-water left over from fracking. Some have been tied to earthquakes.

Fischer says her group plans to continue encouraging residents to learn more about fracking at a public forum next Monday in Ravenna.


 
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