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What happen now that Ohio voters have OK'd the anti-monopoly amendment?
Issue 2 makes it more difficult for voters to pass any measure that uses the state constitution to create a monopoly, oligopoly or cartel
Story by LEWIS WALLACE
This story is part of a special series.


 
Secretary of State Jon Husted says Issue 2 has malicious intentions and will only make it harder to use the state Constitution to ensure profits for a small group.
Courtesy of WKSU file photo
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Legal pot is not coming to Ohio, at least not yet. But a ballot issue that was meant to prevent marijuana legalization did pass yesterday by a narrow margin.

For Ohio Public Radio, WYSO’s Lewis Wallace has more.

LISTEN: A debate over the impact of Issue 2

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Issue 2 makes it more difficult for voters to pass any measure that uses the state Constitution to create a monopoly, oligopoly or cartel. State legislators put it on the ballot to try to undermine the marijuana effort.

Dudley Taft is one of the Cincinnati-based investors who advocated and paid for the marijuana campaign and opposed issue 2.

“Issue 2 is the most ham-handed amendment by any state Legislature I’ve ever heard of. I think it’s undemocratic and un-American and I think it’s dirty politics,” said Taft.

He and others, including the American Civil Liberties Union, argue that it could make it even harder and more expensive for citizen-initiated amendments to pass. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted disagrees.

“The Constitution is not there to grant people special rights,” said Husted.

He says  Issue 2 will just make it harder to use the state Constitution to ensure profits for a small group—like the casinos, which passed their own constitutional monopoly a few years back.

In the future, it will fall to the bipartisan Ohio Ballot Board to decide whether a proposed amendment creates a monopoly.

 
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